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Hyogo Agreement

The Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) is a global blueprint for disaster risk reduction adopted in 2005. It was named after the Japanese city of Hyogo, which was severely affected by the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake. The agreement was created by the United Nations and signed by 168 countries to reduce the impact of natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, droughts, and hurricanes on people and their communities.

The HFA is a 10-year framework that aims to make the world safer by reducing the vulnerability of people and their communities to disasters. It encourages countries to adopt policies that promote disaster risk reduction and to allocate resources to achieve these goals. The framework focuses on five priorities for action: building the resilience of nations and communities to disasters, identifying, assessing and monitoring disaster risks, reducing the underlying risk factors, increasing the preparedness for effective response and recovery, and strengthening disaster risk governance.

The HFA helps to promote the idea of risk reduction and specifies what needs to be done to make communities safer. One of the key aspects of the agreement is the emphasis on reducing the underlying causes of disasters. It focuses on the need to address social, economic, and environmental factors that increase vulnerability to disasters. The HFA also stresses the importance of integrating disaster risk reduction into development planning, policies, and programs, as well as enhancing public awareness of the risks.

In 2015, the HFA was succeeded by the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, which was adopted at the Third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan. The new framework builds on the HFA and aims to reduce disaster risk, particularly in developing countries, over the next 15 years.

In conclusion, the Hyogo Framework for Action is a critical agreement that has helped to reduce the impact of natural disasters on people and their communities. It emphasizes the importance of reducing the root causes of disasters and integrating disaster risk reduction into development planning and policies. While the HFA is no longer in effect, the new Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction continues the important work of reducing disaster risk around the world.

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